Posts Tagged ‘Spanish wine’

 

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Picante Grande Meseta Tempranillo Shiraz 2010

Vintage: 2010

Style: Medium bodied red

Country: Spain 

Region: Central Spain 

Overview When selecting this wine I was choosing something that I believed would be a simple drink. Nothing mind blowing or overly complex, just a nice drink that I could sit down, put my feet up and enjoy. It was probably the price tag that made me think this, $11.99 I think I bought it for. The wine in the glass, however punched well above its weight, floored me, put me down for the count and made me feel guilty that I was drinking this on my own and not sharing it. I should have seen it coming really, those Spaniards are notorious for making great, inexpensive red wines. Where I really discovered the great potential of this wine was when I matched it with food, the spice and fresh fruit came to life when paired with fennel seed and pepper crusted pork.

Tempranillo and Shiraz are great partners. I’ve seen many, great cheap wines of this blend out of both Spain and Italy. Both have different dimensions of fruit and spice that lend to one another. This wine does not see oak which adds vibrancy and freshness which can sometimes be missing in a red wine.

This wine has the Spitting:Optional guarantee. Try it and if you don’t like it I will not give you back any money but subject you to a stern talking to.

Tasting note: An attractive, floral nose with tones of strawberry, blueberry and white pepper these characters carry on to the palate with savoury spice, crushed rosemary and finishes with grainy tannins. It is reminiscent of a good, entry level Cote du Rhone.

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Final Say: Looking for an inexpensive wine to impress with? Look no further, pick it up for between $11 and $15 and enjoy.

 

Score: 18 out of 20 (90 out of 100)

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Elefante Tempranillo Shiraz 2010

 

Vintage: 2010

 

Style: Medium-full bodied red

 

Country: Spain 

 

Region: Castilla la Mancha

 

 

 

Overview: The strong Australian dollar has wreaked havoc on our attempts to export wine into other countries. On the other hand however, it has made it cheaper for distributors to export international wines to our own shores. As a result there are some great, reasonably priced international wines floating about at the moment and this wine is one of them. Elefante means elephant in Spanish, der, however the symbol for the Elefante wines is a bull. I’m not really sure what the meaning is there, perhaps something is lost in translation. Perhaps it’s some deep metaphor. Like this wine is so large like an elephant that it is a bull. I should write anecdotes for Buddhists. I really don’t know, I tried this wine when it was first launched in 2009 and while impressed by its value for money, the Elefante/Bull confused me, it still does. So much so, even as I write this I am perplexed. Someone please help me solve the Elefante/Bull code before my brain heads into a mess of trucks, horns and hooves.

 

Long story short, this wine is absurdly good for the price. Very funky packaging lets it jump off the shelf. From reading the wine making practices it seems some good quality fruit goes into these wines. The Tempranillo vines are ‘Goblet’ bush vines which are low yielding. Low yields= fruit intensity (in most cases).

 

 

 

Tasting note: Lifted cherry and white pepper on the nose. Flavour of cherry, spice and pepper at the forefront of the palate supported by grainy, chewy tannins. Not too rich and not too serious. Quite elegant and balanced

 

 

 

Final Say: Looking for a cheap crowd pleaser? Give this little blend a go. You can’t go wrong for $10-$12 a bottle.

 

 

 

Score: 16 out of 20

 

 

 

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Jack Davis

 

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Martinsancho Verdejo 2010

Vintage: 2010

Style: Dry White

Country: Spain

Region: Rueda

 

Overview: I was once told that any variety beginning with ‘V’ is a hard sell. This was about five years ago, I disagreed then and disagree now. While I admit this may have been true in Australia 15 years ago and while I agree varieties like Viognier, Verdelho and Verduzzo will never sell the volume that Sauv Blanc, Shiraz and Chardonnay do I believe as we become more educated about these ‘strange’ varieties we learn exactly where they will fit in our wine collections. After all the are almost as many varieties starting with ‘V’ then there are starting with any other letter (this may be an exaggeration but there are around 27 varieties that start with ‘V’).

Verdejo is a variety that is typically grown to make an oxidised, Sherry-like wine. In Rueda, Spain they use the variety to make a great table wine which is slowly gaining popularity. When made as a table wine Verdejo herbaceous and has lovely tropical characters. I have read that it ages quite well but I have never had a chance to taste a cellared Verdejo.

 

Tasting note: A tropical nose, white nectarine and pineapple. White stone fruit on the palate, rich and full initially yet delicate and elegant on the finish. A great food wine.

 

Final Say: The Martinsancho Verdejo is often used referred to as a benchmark Verdejo, I agree wholeheartedly. Eat with seafood of creamy chicken dishes and you’ll appreciate this variety all the more. It sells for approx. $35 a bottle.

 

Score: 17 out of 20 (85 out of 100)

 

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Jack Davis

 

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Wine Blog

Overview

Hailing all the way from Jumilla, Spain, a region known for Monastrell (more commonly known as Mourvedre or Mataro). This wine however is a blend of Monastrell (40%), Tempranillo (40%) and Cabernet Sauvignon (20%) and loads of personality. Though this wine has stolen my heart it will never be widely acclaimed by critics and will probably be frowned upon by Australian Wine Show Judges as they contort their faces into to that ‘Mmm no thanks’ face. Let me tell you why. There is a ‘green’ character on the nose and palate, most likely from the Cabernet component of the blend, which sticks out like a gremlin amongst mogwais but the reason why I find this wine interesting and supremely drinkable is that this ‘gremlin’ character integrates itself with the strawberry and tar characters that are the dominate flavours in this wine and make it so flavoursome that the second glass comes faster then expected.

Tasting Note

Strawberry and tar on the nose with an underlying leafy character. The strawberry character is reminiscent of a good Grenache but supported by a tobacco, tar, soft tannins and a linear acid that helps the wine linger in the mouth. A surprisingly good match with nachos, yes I know; strange food match but it was Friday… enough said.

Final Say

You can pick this wine up for anywhere between $17 and $25 so why wouldn’t you? It’s an interesting wine, one that had me enraptured the moment I drew that white cork from the almost black bottle. You’ll be hard pressed to find a wine of this price with as much character as this cheeky number.

Score

17.5 out of 20 (88 of of 100): Freakin’ awesome.

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

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Jack Davis

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