Posts Tagged ‘White Wine’

Tulloch ‘Hunter River White’ Semillon 2014Tull Sem

Style: Dry White

Region: Hunter Valley, NSW

Tasting note: Restrained nose with gentle citrus notes. Elegant palate with nice, pure lime, some straw and persistent acidity. Desert dry, squeaky clean and fresh. Text book Semillon, just needs some time in the cellar.

Final Say: Throw it in a dark cupboard for 5-10 years. $25 a bottle.

Score: 18.5

Tulloch Semillon Sauvignon Blanc 2014sem-sav Tull

Style: Dry White

Region: Hunter Valley, NSW

Tasting note: All you could ask for from this blend on the nose, snow pea, citrus and cut grass. Nice lime and rich lemon, great acidity and good balance between phenolics (grassiness) and tropical fruit. Very enjoyable.

Final Say: A fantastic wine for the upcoming festive season. $16 a bottle

Score: 17.5

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Frankland Estate ‘Rocky Gully’ Riesling 2012

Vintage: 2012

Style: Dry white

Country: Australia

Region: Frankland River, WA

 

Overview:       Short and sweet this week, the blog that is, not the wine.

The Frankland River in Western Australia has been overshadowed by the better known Riesling regions such as the Eden and Clare Valleys. However, you only need to look at wines like this one to see that the Frankland River deserves to be recognized as a great Australian Riesling region. This wine is typically elegant, dry with subtle fruit and minerality. Criminal at this price.

It’s not just about the Valleys.

 

Tasting note: Elegant nose, aromas of Granny Smith apples and talc. All the usual characters on the palate, typical Riesling flavours of lime juice, sherbet and stone-like minerality. Bone dry with great length and fruit purity.

 

Final Say: A guaranteed winner to stave off spontaneous combustion in this heat. $13-$18 a bottle. Great for seafood, light chicken dishes or just on its own.

 

Score: 17.5 out of 20

 

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

Orden Tercera Verdejo 2011

Posted: December 11, 2012 in Spain
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Orden

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Orden Tercera Verdejo 2011

Vintage: 2011

Style: Dry White

Country: Spain

Region: Rueda

 

Overview: ‘Tis the season to scramble around frantically with the hordes, pointing at useless objects such as a vase that doubles as a fully functioning dinosaur robot yelling in pure panic, ‘Do you think such-and-such would like that?’ ‘Tis the season to fumble around on the internet buying presents from Bulgaria, hoping and praying that it gets here in time for Christmas. ‘Tis the season to put reindeer antlers on your pets and lower their self-esteem by forcing them to pose for you so that you can exploit them for your homemade Christmas cards.  ‘Tis the season to put your feet up and enjoy a damn fine drop from Spain.

Verdejo is an aromatic, elegant variety that matches well with seafood and light chicken dishes and is predominantly grown in the Rueda region of Spain. It’s a great alternative to varieties like Riesling, Verdelho and Semillon.

 

Tasting note: A lifted, fresh nose which includes aromas of straw, peach and melon. On the palate there is the typical talc character with hints of white flesh nectarine and jasmine flowers. The finishes clean and flinty yet creamy at the same time.

 

Final Say: Chill out, and have a glass of Verdejo. $26 dollars a bottle.

Score: 18 out of 20 (90 out of 100)

 

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Jack Davis

Muros Antigos Vinho Verde 2010

Posted: November 27, 2012 in Portugal
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Muros Antigos Vinho Verde 2010

Vintage: 2010

Style: Dry white

Country: Portugal   

Region: Melgaço 

Overview: Summer has firmly marked its arrival this year and with it came a plethora of first world problems, the heat being the main problem. As the temperature hit forty degrees I found that our air-conditioner had decided that it was having a holiday and no matter how many times I mashed the buttons on the remote control it would not return to grace me with its cool, cool air. I became desperate to alleviate my discomfort; I found a spray bottle which I cleverly filled with water. I then wandered around in circles, spraying the fine mist into the air in front of me, walking through the fine, cool droplets. This was fine for the short time before the water in the bottle became quite hot in the sweltering heat and I absently sprayed my face. I then started screaming “Lava! Lava!” while running around in a manic circle believing that my face was melting off. The only remedy for my fickle problems was a good Portuguese white.

This wine is a blend of Alvarinho (70%) and Loureiro (30%), Alvarinho is also known as Albarino with is an aromatic, elegant variety predominantly grown in Spain and Portugal.

Tasting note. A nose of granny smith apples and delicate talc. Citrus on the palate with that elegant talc character from the nose, a touch of jasmine and sandalwood, finishing with a austere minerality and gentle acidity.

Final Say: Save yourself from the heat and give this refreshing wine a try. You can pick it up for around $30 a bottle.

Score: 17.5 out of 20

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

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Jack Davis

 

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Helen’s Hill ‘The Nemesis’ Arneis 2011

Vintage: 2011

Style: Dry, lightly oaked white

Country: Australia 

Region: Yarra Valley 

Overview: Arneis is known as the ‘Little Rascal’ in Piedmont as it is a difficult variety to grow. It is as ‘Little Rascal’ to me because every time I type the word Arneis I, without fail, always spell it Arnies and then, through some kind of Pavlovian response I have to yell “Get to the chopper!” It’s a nightmare for me and anyone who is around me at the time.

Arneis is a variety made famous by the Piedmont region in Italy and can be made in a number of ways, typically fermented in stainless steel and then left on ‘lees’, the sediment left by yeast at the end of the fermentation process, this lees contact adds texture to the wine. It can also be fermented in oak to give it a bit more body and complexity. This Arneis was made in the latter style with another dimension of complexity granted by a ‘Wild Yeast’ fermentation. Wild Yeast is not some kind of crazy party animal as the name would suggest but the natural yeast that lives in wineries which can impart some very interesting characters that you can’t get from typical cultured yeast (depending on the species present sometimes Wild Yeast can be unpredictable).

The gamble has paid off for this wine. It is one of the better Aussie Arneis I have tried. Before reading the tasting notes please take a moment to think of the people around me at the time of writing this review.

Tasting note: A funky nose, pear and toasty oak. Pear on the palate, almonds, creamy with subtle oak integration. A very good food wine. Don’t bother cellaring this wine, enjoy it right now!

Final Say: GET TO THE CHOPPER! And buy this wine. $30 bucks a bottle and a great alternative to Chardonnay

 

Score: 17.5 out of 20

 

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

Also, check out the Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/pages/Spitting-Optional/314535381931908?sk=wall

Jack Davis

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Castle Rock Estate Riesling 2010

Vintage: 2010

Style: Dry White

Country: Australia 

Region: Great Southern, WA 

Overview When asked what my favourite wine is I always reply with ‘It depends on the food I’m having.” I believe that I do not give into favouritism but my partner will disagree and my cellar would support this argument. Riesling is definitely the most prominent variety in my collection of white wines yet in the market place this variety does not share the popularity that it has in this house. When you ask someone in the industry what wine they think will overtake the behemoth Sauvignon Blanc most will answer, “Hopefully Riesling but probably Pinot Grigio or Chardonnay.”

Riesling is the darling variety for people in the industry, we all love it and are frustrated by the fact that the wider market place refuses to embrace this wonderful grape. Perhaps it’s like a maternal/paternal instinct, that we want to nurture the underdog, we want to see it succeed!

In the industry we’ve recently seen winemakers experimenting with Riesling, trialling barrel ferments, wild ferments and lees stirring but I have always found that it is the purity of Riesling that makes it so appealing. Which brings me to this wine. So pure it is that it should not be called Castle Rock Riesling but The Virgin Mother Riesling.

 

Tasting note: Aromas of lime and granny smith apples, these characters are evident on the palate also and are joined by a saltiness and clean, austere minerality. The racy acid on the finish keeps this wine lingering for long after each sip.

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Final Say: So pure it’s holy. A great buy for $20 a bottle. Will develop over the next 2-6 years.

 

Score: 18.5 out of 20 (93 out of 100)

 

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

Also, check out the Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/pages/Spitting-Optional/314535381931908?sk=wall

Jack Davis

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De Bortoli Windy Peak Chardonnay 2011

Vintage: 2011

Style: Dry, oaked white

Country: Australia 

Region: Yarra Valley 

Overview:

A little goes a long, long way. Less is more. Brilliance in simplicity. KISS: Keep it simple, stupid. This wine shows the truth in all these sayings. We all know that the more we try to dress something up the worse it can end up. The same can be said about winemaking. If you have great fruit then you don’t have to do much to it to make a great wine. Each time a winemaker practices a winemaking technique like oak contact or lees stirring etc it effects the natural fruit of a wine. This wine has just enough oak to give it complexity and just enough minerality to make it elegant. The key word is balance. This wine stands in the middle of the see-saw without tipping too far over into either side.

Are we seeing a resurgence in popularity of Chardonnay? To an extent yes but I do not believe that Chardonnay will ever steal the top spot from varieties like Sauvignon Blanc. This is not a bad thing. You see, Chardonnay is a diverse variety and echoes climate and winemaking more so than those simple fruit-driven styles which means each Chardonnay you drink will be different. This is great for serious wine drinkers but for those drinkers who like Sauv Blanc like the fact that they can buy two different Sauv Blanc’s and they will display similar characters. What is great to know is that there are wines like this one that are priced to appeal to a wider market  and show how great Chardonnay can be without costing the earth.

Tasting note:

            Freshly cut grapefruit aromas mingle with subtle, toasty oak. Nice level of ripeness on the palate, peach, grapefruit and honeydew melon with a lingering saltiness. Clean and fresh.

 

Final Say: Great value, great wine. A steal at $14, on special it gets as low as $11.

 

Score: 17 out of 20

 

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

Also, check out the Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/pages/Spitting-Optional/314535381931908?sk=wall

Jack Davis

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Yalumba ‘Y’ Series Vermentino 2011

Vintage: 2011

Style: Dry White

Country: Australia 

Region: South Australia 

Overview:

Welcome to part 2 of the odyssey into grape varieties starting with ‘V’. I’m sure part 1(http://spittingoptional.com/2012/07/17/martinsancho-verdejo-2010/) had your head swimming with plot twists and elaborate storytelling.

There are only around 50 Australian wineries that grow and produce Vermentino making it relatively unknown in Australia. It’s an Italian variety that can sometimes be a little bland. I haven’t tried too many Australian examples of this wine (Brown Brothers, Serafino and Fox Creek to name a few) and this wine, the Yalumba ‘Y’ Series Vermentino, is probably the best example I’ve seen of Australian’s handling this grape, and guess what? It’s the cheapest as well. I was actually taken aback by how good this wine is and how little it cost.

It has the elegance and varietal character of a wine three times its price. Sadly, the price point may mean that it is overlooked by many serious wine drinkers but trust me on this, flip yourself the ‘V’ tonight and give this wine ago. You won’t even notice the money is missing and there’s a fair chance you’ll buy some more.

 

Tasting note: An herbaceous nose with hints of stone fruit. A fresh, lively palate. Rich with nuances of stone fruit, jasmine flowers and talc. It finishes with a salty, briny acid. Begs to be enjoyed with seafood.

 

Final Say: I’ve said it all already all that is left is for you to try it. It sells for $11-$15

Score: 17 out of 20

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

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Jack Davis

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KWV Classic Collection Chenin Blanc 2012

Vintage: 2012

Style: Dry – Just off-dry white

Country: South Africa 

Region: South Africa

 

Overview: Chenin Blanc, sounds like the stage name of a transvestite, right? It’s a variety that is high in acid and ripens with higher sugar levels. It’s a diverse variety and can blended with other white varieties, made into a sparkling wine and even desert wines. The variety is most famous for the French Wine Vouvray from the Loire Valley. Vouvray is typically off-dry with honey characters and ages very well.

Chenin Blanc was introduced to South Africa in the 16th century where also known as Steen, no wonder, Chenin Blanc would be a nightmare to say with a South African accent. Much like Argentina and Chile, South Africa can produce wine very economically which means it hits our shores at ridiculously cheap prices. You can pick up the wines of the KWV Classic Collection Range (formally known as Lifestyle range) for around $11 a bottle.

The touch of sweetness in this wine will help match it with Asian dishes with a bit of spice. The sugar helps tone down the ‘heat’ from food laced with chili; this is good if you’re a wimp like me who feels like they’re on the verge of spontaneous combustion when they simply look at a chili.

 

Tasting note: The nose brings aromas of Granny Smith apples, lanolin, custard apple and lime. On the palate there are nuances of the green apple found on the nose, pear peel, rich yet balanced by delicate talc and jasmine characters and fine acid. There is a touch of Ester still present from the fermentation process (a character of banana) but this will dissipate over time.

 

Final Say: It’s cheap, it’s classy and it’s different. Buy it.

Score: 17.5 out of 20 (88 out of 100)

For any questions or feedback feel free to email me on spittingoptional@gmail.com

Also, check out the Facebook page http://www.facebook.com/pages/Spitting-Optional/314535381931908?sk=wall

Jack Davis